Questions about newborn screening? Check out this article!

Do you, a family member, or a friend have questions about newborn screening? Check out this link below for frequently asked questions about newborn screening procedures. We think you will find it extremely helpful:

http://babysfirsttest.org/newborn-screening/screening-procedures

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DNA Day 2015 Webinar: The Importance of Online Family Health History Tools in Your Practice

The Center for Jewish Genetics coordinated with the Illinois Department of Public Health and iNet (Illinois Network for Education and Training) to provide this year’s Professional Education Activity. Please click on the link below to view this year’s DNA Day webinar: The Importance of Online Family Health History Tools in Your Practice.

https://westernilahecevents.webex.com/westernilahecevents/lsr.php?RCID=0f4e15921818185d7401cbb68bab19f0

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DNA Day 2015 Educational Material

Every year for the commemoration of DNA Day the Center for Jewish Genetics works alongside the Illinois Department of Public Health to distribute important material regarding genetic testing. This year, we made three different pamphlets that focused on updates in newborn screening, the importance of collecting one’s family health history, and online tools that aid in this collection. Check them out below!

What's New in Newborn Screening

What’s New in Newborn Screening

My Family Health History

My Family Health History

Online Tools for Collecting Family Health History

Online Tools for Collecting Family Health History

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Check out our DNA Day material on display!

The Center for Jewish Genetics sent packets of our DNA Day 2015 material to health care departments across Illinois! We then asked the departments to send us pictures of their material on display. We love to see how each health care department is promoting DNA Day in their community. Check out our pictures of our material on display!

Kanakee County Health Department

Kankakee County Health Department

St. Clair County Health Department

St. Clair County Health Department

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View our DNA Day Webinar NOW!

On April 21st the Center for Jewish Genetics hosted the annual DNA Day webinar which works to promote the importance of family health history and newborn screening. This year, we focused on online tools for collecting family health history in health care practice.

Click the link below to view the successful and informative webinar:

“The Importance of Online Family Health History Tools in Your Practice”

https://westernilahecevents.webex.com/westernilahecevents/lsr.php?RCID=0f4e15921818185d7401cbb68bab19f0

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DNA Day 2015 Webinar Registration is now OPEN!

The Center for Jewish Genetics’ DNA Day 2015 webinar, “The Importance of Online Family Health History Tools in Your Practice” is now OPEN for registration!

http://events.constantcontact.com/register/event?llr=qgwiiwiab&oeidk=a07eakyqq4red5a578e

The webinar will be held on April 21st at 12:00 p.m. and will be offered for 1.0 Nursing Contact Hours.

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Feel free to contact me (CarolineHall@juf.org) for more information!

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When should you see a genetic counselor based on your family health history?

You should consider seeing a Genetic Counselor if you have a family history of:

1. A known genetic disorder. Examples include: cystic fibrosis, hereditary cancer, and or Tay-Sachs in a family member.

2. A known genetic mutation. For example, an identified breast cancer mutation such as BRCA1 or BRCA2, or an identified mutation for Cystic Fibrosis.

3. Health conditions that are present in more than one family member. For example, colon cancer or rare diseases in more than one relative.

3. Health problems that occur at an earlier than expected age. For example, cancer before the age of 50 in any relative.

4. Sudden cardiac death in a person who otherwise seemed healthy.

5. Diseases in paired organs. For example, diseases that affect both eyes, or a disease that affects both lungs.

6. Birth defects, growth or development problems, pregnancy concerns. For example, congenital heart defects, cleft palate, dysmorphic features in a newborn, or delays in speech or school.

7. Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry. If there is a family history of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, couples should seek genetic counseling prior to pregnancy to consider carrier screening.

8. Couples who are related by blood.

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